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Trajectories of Early Career Research

Trajectories of Early Career Research- Logo


The Early Career Research (ECR) project is a mixed-methods study of student development outcomes and equity among doctoral students in the biological sciences as they complete their graduate programs and transition into their careers. This longitudinal study follows a national sample of 286 biology Ph.D. students through their final stages of graduate school and into their early years in the scientific workforce. The study has several overarching goals:

  1. To identify the ways in which the development of research skills and professional goals during graduate training may predict postdoctoral career attainment and trajectories
  2. To examine the capacity of postdoctoral research positions to serve as inflection points in ECR career trajectories
  3. To explore how race, gender, and other demographic characteristics shape the relationship between graduate student and postdoctoral experiences and subsequent career outcomes

This project is funded by the National Science Foundation, grant number 1760894. This project builds on the earlier work funded by the NSF through collaborative grants DGE-1431290 and DGE-1431234. For questions about the research, please contact David Feldon (david.feldon@usu.edu).






Assorted Findings

This graph shows the progression of 3 different latent classes across time concerning the variables listed below. On a scale from 0-3, the mean scores of each of the latent classes are shown. Across time, the highest class shows the most progression. For example, from year one to year four, the variable INT shows growth from a mean of 2.3 to 2.8. The growth across the rest of the variables in this latent class is very similar, with an upward trajectory for all of the variables to some extent. In the middle latent class, there is a varied amount of growth and loss of skills, with many of the skill levels being spread out in year one, and while the lower skills (SEL, ANA, and PRE)  increase (PRE at 0.2 in year one, and 1.6 in year four), the higher skills (INT, LIT, HYP, CTR, ALT, IMP, and LIM) stay nearly the same across all years (INT at 2.2 in year one, and 2.3 in year four). In the lowest class, the points are below 1.6 across all years, with an apparent downward or plateaued trend in every variable. For example, EXP goes from 1.6 to 1.4 from year one to year four. The above figure is from the publication Postdocs’ Lab Engagement Predicts Trajectories of Ph.D. Students’ Skill Development. Using writing samples which reported studies, written by participants, research skills were measured (introducing the context of the study (INT), integrating literature appropriately (LIT), establishing testable hypotheses (HYP), appropriate controls and replication (CTR), experimental design (EXP), appropriately selecting data for analysis (SEL), data analysis itself (ANA), presentation of results (PRE), basing conclusions on results (CON), alternate explanations of findings (ALT), limitations of the study (LIM), and implications of the findings (IMP), all of which can be seen in the figure above). Using the measurements of the above skills, high, medium, and low skill growth groups were found. The above figure illustrates these three latent subgroups and their growth through time. To learn more about how these subgroups are affected by their doctoral training, read the article above.

Class 1- Faculty and Peer: Academic and Social/Personal. Class 2- Peer only: Academic and Social/Personal. Class 3- Peer Only: Social/Personal. Class 4- Faculty and Peer: Field-Related Research. Pie charts containing the following information: Female: 43% Class 1, 42% Class 2, 8% Class 3, 7% Class 4. Male: 42% Class 1, 40% Class 2, 9% Class 3, 9% Class 4. Domestic: 47% Class 1, 42% Class 2, 7% Class 3, 4% Class 4. International: 21% Class 1, 37% Class 2, 15% Class 3, 27% Class 4. White: 47% Class 1, 45% Class 2, 7% Class 3, 1% Class 4. Asian: 25% Class 1, 37% Class 2, 11% Class 3, 27% Class 4. Underrepresented Minorities: 45% Class 1, 35% Class 2, 10% Class 3, 10% Class 4.

The above figure is from the publication Identifying Faculty and Peer Interaction Patterns of First-Year Biology Doctoral Students: A Latent Class Analysis which examined how different demographics interact with their peers and faculty advisors, specifically within doctoral programs. The article also outlines the percieved effects that this socialization has on various academic and research outcomes. For more information, read the article above.


Two line graphs. The left graph contains the mean experimental design self-efficacy plus or minus 1 standard deviation with data separated by gender. Within the male data, the plus one standard deviation begins at roughly 32 hours, the mean at about 27, and the minus one standard deviation at around 21. The lines act independently, moving towards and meeting at roughly 31 hours by the 5th biweekly time period. The graph then decreases, with the lines spreading back out, with the low point of the mean line being roughly 21 by the 12th biweekly period. The lines then move back together, nearly meeting at roughly 28 in the final (15th) time period. Within the female data, all of the lines begin at 21, slightly spreading out and steadily increasing with the mean line being at about 42 by the 6th biweekly time period. The lines once again increase with the mean at about 49 at the 9th biweekly time period. After this, the lines once again fall and move slightly closer together, with the mean line reaching roughly 45 hours by the 15th time period. The graph on the right contains two lines, a female line and a male line. The male line begins at a roughly 56% probability of publication, with an increasing slope of 10% per 8 hours of research. The female line also begins at roughly 56% with a decreasing slope of 10% per 7 hours.

The above figures are from the publication Time-to-Credit Gender Inequities of First-Year PhD Students in the Biological Sciences which examined graduate student's research hours logged and the authorship claimed by the said research students with reference to their gender. The graph on the left shows the changes in time spent on research by gender across time. The graph on the right shows the probability of article publication based on research hours, separated by gender. For more information, read the article above.







People

Core Research Team

David Feldon

Dr. David Feldon (Utah State University)

Dr. Feldon is a professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at USU. His research examines two lines of inquiry that are distinct but mutually supportive. The first characterizes the cognitive components of expertise as they contribute to effective and innovative problem solving as well as how they affect the quality of instruction that experts can provide. The second examines the development of research skills within STEM disciplines as a function of instruction and other educational support mechanisms. He also conducts some research into technology-facilitated instructional approaches and research methods for examining them. Read more about Dr. Feldon.
Josipa Roksa

Dr. Josipa Roksa (University of Virginia)

Dr. Roksa's current research centers on two main areas: a) understanding the role of families and relationships between families and higher education institutions in fostering student success, and b) examining how students’ experiences in college contribute to inequalities in STEM fields. Professor Roksa has been keenly interested in understanding how educational institutions compensate for (or amplify) inequalities in family resources. After considering the role of cultural capital in K-12 education and transition into college, she is engaged in a series of projects that aim to understand how family support and resources are related to higher education success, particularly for first-generation and low-income students. Read more about Dr. Roksa.
Kimberly Griffin

Dr. Kimberly Griffin (University of Maryland)

Dr. Griffin's research interests are primarily focused in three areas: diversity in graduate education and the professoriate; diversity within the Black higher education community; and mentoring and career development. These interests have led her to conduct work on a variety of topics, including: career development of Ph.D. completers in science, Black professors and their engagement in student interaction, the experiences of Black immigrant college students, diversity recruitment in graduate education, and campus racial climate. Dr. Griffin is skilled in advanced quantitative and qualitative methods, as well as the integration of these strategies in mixed methods research. Read more about Dr. Griffin.
Kaylee Litson

Dr. Kaylee Litson (Utah State University)

Kaylee earned her Ph.D. from at Utah State University, studying quantitative psychology. Broadly, she is interested in the development of constructively defined latent variable models. The types of latent variable models in which Kaylee is most interested include measurement models and structural equation models. She is particularly interested in combining statistical models that evaluate longitudinal processes (i.e., change, stability, and causation) with latent measurement models. Her areas of expertise include structural equation modeling, latent state-trait analysis, multitrait-multimethod analysis, mediation analysis, moderated mediation analysis, factor mixture modeling, and latent growth curve modeling.
Brinleigh Cahoon

Brinleigh Cahoon (Utah State University)

Brinleigh (she/her) is an undergraduate business-marketing student at Utah State University. While in high school, Brinleigh was awarded an International Baccalaureate Diploma for writing essays concerning varied topics from the effects of Thailand’s 19th century westernisation on modern day Thailand to the correlation between CO2 levels and honey bee population. She also conducted experiments concerning the effects of stress on plant growth. As such, Brinleigh is interested in the mental health of Ph.D. students and is continuing similar research as a research assistant and website coordinator.
Jesse McCain

Jesse McCain (University of Virginia)

Jesse McCain is a PhD student in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Virginia and is originally from Tucson, AZ. Jesse explores issues of inequality, equity, and identity in educational contexts. His research uses qualitative methodologies and social theory to critically understand the socialization experiences of graduate students. He is particularly interested in highly professionalized sectors of higher education such as law and their role in the reproduction of inequality. Additionally, Jesse is concerned with how students from underrepresented backgrounds develop professional identities. Jesse received his BA in Political Science and MA in Higher Education from the University of Arizona.
Joakina Stone

Joakina Stone (University of Maryland)

Joakina Stone is a PhD student in the Student Affairs program at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research interests include using a critical race and intersectional lens to explore and understand the experiences of Black undergraduate and graduate students. Throughout her 10-year career in higher education, she has worked in various functional areas including residential life, academic advising, and diversity and inclusion initiatives at historically white and historically Black institutions. She is committed to highlighting the experiences of Black women in her scholarship and practice. In addition to being a part-time PhD student, Joakina works full time at a non- profit educational organization supporting African American undergraduate students in STEM majors.
Nohe'a Pauni

Nohe'a Pauni (Utah State University)

Nohe'a Pauni is a Tongan (Pacific Islander), undergraduate, pre-medicine, biology student at USU. He graduated as an honors student from Hunter High School in West Valley City, Utah, where he received recognition from the West Valley City Mayor for academic excellence. Currently, he is a research assistant for the Feldon Lab in the Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at USU. Broadly, he is interested in medical research, neurological diseases, and surgery.
Soojeong Jeong

Dr. Soojeong Jeong (Arizona State University)

Dr. Jeong completed her Ph.D. in the ITLS department at USU and is currently engaging in postdoctoral research at Arizona State University. She earned an M.A. in Education, with an emphasis in Educational Technology from Korea University in Seoul, South Korea. She also holds a B.A. in Education and a B.S. in Mathematics Education, both of which she obtained at the same university. Her main interest areas include self-regulated learning, metacognition, technology integration into teaching and learning, as well as mathematics education. Currently, she is conducting her dissertation research that examines how college students develop their self-regulated learning strategies over time through an academic support program called Supplemental Instruction.
Zhang Feng

Zhang Feng (Utah State University)

Zhang Feng is a PhD student in the ITLS department at Utah State University. He earned an M.A. in Applied Linguistics with an emphasis on Educational Technology in China. His main research interests include cognitive load theory, technology integration into teaching and learning (VR and smart learning), as well as graduate education.

Affiliated Researchers (Alphabetically)

Annie Wofford

Annie Wofford (University of California, Los Angeles)

Annie Wofford is a Ph.D. candidate in Higher Education and Organizational Change at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research primarily explores STEM students' graduate school and career-related trajectories, with an emphasis on creating equitable student development in pathways to and through STEM graduate education. Annie's dissertation research uses quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the role of mentorship and psychosocial attributes in students' graduate school trajectories within computing disciplines. In addition to her work with ECR, she serves as the project lead of longitudinal surveys for the Building, Recruiting, and Inclusion for Diversity (BRAID) research project, a nationwide study of equity in collegiate computing.
Ashley Hixson

Dr. Ashley Hixson (University of Maryland)

Ashley Hixson (she/her) is a Ph.D. student in the Higher Education, Student Affairs, and International Educational Policy Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her professional portfolio includes climate study research, leadership education, multicultural programming, TRIO, academic advising, career counseling, and new student orientation. Additionally, her research interests focus on the intersections of race, gender, and technology, the diverse experiences of Black collegians and academics within higher education, career pathways for professionals of color, and graduate education equity and inclusion initiatives.
Brooke Dinsmore

Brooke Dinsmore (University of Virginia)

Brooke Dinsmore is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Virginia. Her research explores race, class, and gender inequalities in education with a focus on relationships, culture, and digital technology. Her dissertation compares the impact of COVID 19 school closures on teacher-student relationships at two American high schools. Expanding upon six months of observations conducted prior to school closures, the project addresses how school policy responses and teacher strategies are mitigating - or amplifying - race and class disparities in student experience and outcomes. Her research has been published in Information, Communication & Society and Ethnography and funded by the National Science Foundation and the University of Virginia Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.
Candace Miller

Dr. Candace Miller (Indiana University)

Dr. Miller’s primary research addresses issues at the intersection of racial, spatial, and cultural inequality. Her current project examines the disparate impacts of urban transformation on Black-owned and white-owned small businesses in Detroit, MI. Additionally, Dr. Miller’s interest in the inequalities embedded in organizations have led to projects examining the intersectional nature of inequality in the academic workspace and how art, architecture, and spatial arrangement shape REM students’ construction of spatial meanings and sense of belonging on campus. For more information,click here.
Di-Tu Dissassa

Di-Tu Dissassa (University of Maryland)

Di-Tu Dissassa (pronouns she/her/hers)is a current Ph.D. student in Student Affairs at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dissassa graduated with her Master of Arts from the University of Missouri - Kansas City in 2014 and has experience working in multicultural student affairs, intergroup dialogue, and residence life. Dissassa currently works as a Graduate Administrative Assistant in the Center for Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education (CDIHE) and as a Cross Cultural Graduate Coordinator in the office of Multicultural Involvement and Community Advocacy (MICA). Her scholarly interests include staff of color perceptions of campus racial climate, hate crimes/bias incidents at undergraduate institutions, multiethnic & second-generation immigrant student identity development, and diversity in STEM. She is committed to her goals of lifelong learning and helping spread the importance of intercultural development to create global change.
Jennifer Blaney

Dr. Jennifer Blaney (Idaho State University)

Dr. Blaney is an assistant professor of higher education at Idaho State university, where she studies gender equity and student development in STEM disciplines. Prior to joining this research team, she earned her Ph.D. in Higher Education and Organizational Change from UCLA and worked as the Senior Data Manager on the Building, Recruiting, and Inclusion for Diversity (BRAID) Research project, a multi-institution study of equity in computer science education. More recently, Dr. Blaney has been studying community college pathways as a mechanism for broadening women's participation in computing and other STEM fields.
Jina Kang

Dr. Jina Kang (Utah State University)

Dr. Kang is an assistant professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at USU. Her research interest lies in learning analytics in diverse learning environments designed for P-16 contexts in STEM disciplines, toward a twofold aim. The first goal is to apply learning analytics to provide key evidence of the scientific skill building process by investigating learning processes including multimodal behavior data and other artifacts. The second goal is to design a learning platform that teaches students learning analytics and, more broadly, data literacy skills required in STEM disciplines to facilitate their scientific problem-solving processes and ultimately support STEM workforce preparation. Read more about Dr. Kang.

Stephanie Breen

Stephanie Breen (University of Maryland)

Stephanie Breen is a first-year doctoral student in the Student Affairs concentration program at the University of Maryland, College Park. Breen completed master’s degree in Sociology and Education at Teacher’s College at Columbia University. Currently, she is a proud McNair Fellow at the University of Maryland and a Graduate Assistant under Dr. Kimberly Griffin. Breen’s current research centers education opportunity programming for underrepresented students and equity-based initiatives for institutional change.
Terra Hall

Terra Hall (University of Maryland)

Terra Hall is a PhD student in the Higher Education, Student Affairs, and International Education Policy (HESI) program at the University of Maryland, College Park. As a practitioner, her career spans over 14 years in orientation, first-year experience, and academic support services. These professional experiences have informed her research interests that center on increasing access for women of color and minoritized students, staff, and faculty in higher education. Further, she uses her scholarship to illuminate institutional responsibility for creating equitable educational environments for underrepresented minority populations.
Yapeng Wang

Yapeng Wang (University of Virginia)

Yapeng Wang is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology, University of Virginia. He earned an MA in sociology from UVA and an MS in Global China Studies from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He is interested in social stratification, inequality in higher education and labor markets, and computational social science. His dissertation investigates how mobility pathways are associated with college success for students from different socioeconomic backgrounds. In addition, he is exploring questions related to inequality in higher education in China and graduate education in the US.



Publications


Feldon, D. F., Franco, J., & Jeong, S. (2020). Education and STEM. In P. Ward, J. M. Schraagen, Gore, J., & E. Roth (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Expertise: Research & Application. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Feldon, D. F. (2019). Implications of measurement issues for advancing the socialization framework. In L. DeAngelo & J. C. Weidman (Eds.), Socialization in higher education and the early career: Theory, research and application. New York: Springer International Publishing AG.

Feldon, D. F., Litson, K., Jeong, S., Blaney, J., Kang, J., Miller, C., Griffin, & Roksa, J. (2019). Postdocs’ lab engagement predicts trajectories of Ph.D. students’ skill development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Jeong, S., Blaney, J., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Identifying faculty and peer interaction patterns of first-year biology doctoral students: A latent class analysis. CBE—Life Sciences Education.

Jeong, S., Litson, K., Blaney, J., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Shifting gears: Characteristics and consequences of latent class transitions in doctoral socialization. Research in Higher Education.

Maher, M., Wofford, A., Roksa, J., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Doctoral student experiences in biological sciences laboratory rotations. Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education.

Maher, M., Wofford, A., Roksa, J., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Exploring early exits: Doctoral attrition in the biomedical sciences. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory, & Practice.

Miller, C., & Roksa, J. (2019). Balancing research and service in academia: Gender, race, and laboratory tasks. Gender and Society.

Roksa, J., Feldon, D. F., & Maher, M. (2018). First-generation students in pursuit of the Ph.D.: Comparing socialization experiences and outcomes to continuing-generation peers. Journal of Higher Education.

Roksa, J., Jeong, S., Feldon, D., & Maher, M. (2018). Revisiting the “Model Minority” stereotype: API students’ socialization experiences and research productivity. Research in Sociology of Education.

Roksa, J., and Miller, C. (2018). Flexibility and Exploration as Cultural Capital: Occupational Pathways after the Ph.D. American Sociological Association.

Roksa, J., Whitley, S., Wofford, A., and Feldon, D. F. (2018). Relationships with Peers and Advisors: Comparison of First-Generation and Continuing-Generation Students’ Experiences. American Educational Research Association.

Feldon, D. F., Jeong, S., Peugh, J., Roksa, J., Maahs-Fladung, C., Shenoy, A., & Oliva, M. (2017). Null effects of boot camps and short-format training for Ph.D. students in life sciences. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(37), 9854-9858.

Feldon, D. F., Peugh, J., Maher, M. A., Roksa, J., & Tofel-Grehl, C. (2017). Time-to-credit gender inequities of first-year PhD students in the biological sciences. CBE-Life Sciences Education.

Feldon, D. F., Sun, V., & Rates, C. (2017). Doctoral threshold concepts in the biological sciences. International Journal of Science Education.

Feldon, D. F. (2016). The development of expertise in scientific research. In R. Scott & S. Kosslyn (Eds.), Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (pp.1-14). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Related Research


Feldon, D. F., Maher, M., Roksa, J., & Peugh, J. (2016). Cumulative advantage in the skill development of STEM graduate students: A mixed methods study. American Educational Research Journal, 53, 132-161.

Gilmore, J., Maher, M, & Feldon, D. F. (2016). Prevalence, prevention, and pedagogical techniques: Academic integrity and ethical professional practice among STEM students. In T. Bretag (Ed.), Handbook of Academic Integrity (pp. 729-748). New York: Springer.

Gilmore, J. A., Vieyra, M., Timmerman, B. E., Feldon, D. F., & Maher, M. A. (2015). The relationship between undergraduate research participation and subsequent research performance of early career STEM graduate students. The Journal of Higher Education, 86, 834-863.

Feldon, D. F., Maher, M. A., Hurst, M., & Timmerman, B. (2015). Faculty mentors’, graduate students’, and performance-based assessments of students’ research skill development. American Educational Research Journal, 52, 334-370.

Gilmore, J., Maher, M., Lewis, D., Feldon, D., & Timmerman, B. (2015). Feeding two birds with one scone? The relationship between teaching and research for graduate students across the disciplines. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 27(1), 25-41.

Maher, M. A., Gilmore, J. A., Feldon, D. F., & Davis, T. E. (2014). Connected or conflicted? Doctoral students’ evolving perceptions of the teaching-research relationship. Journal of School Public Relations, 35, 402-425.

Gilmore, J., Maher, M., Feldon, D., & Timmerman, B. (2014). Exploration of factors related to the development of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate teaching assistants’ teaching orientations. Studies in Higher Education, 39, 1910-1928.

Maher, M. A., Feldon, D. F., Timmerman, B., & Chao, J. (2014). Faculty perceptions of common challenges encountered by novice doctoral writers. Higher Education Research & Development, 33, 699-711.

Maher, M. A., Timmerman, B. E., Feldon, D. F., & Strickland, D. (2013). Factors affecting the occurrence of faculty-doctoral student coauthorship. The Journal of Higher Education, 84, 121-143.

Timmerman, B., Feldon, D. F., Maher, M., Strickland, D., & Gilmore, J. A. (2013). Performance-based assessment of graduate student research skills: Timing, trajectory, and potential thresholds. Studies in Higher Education, 38, 693-710.

Maher, M. A., Gilmore, J. A., Feldon, D. F., & Davis, T. E. (2013). Cognitive apprenticeship and the supervision of science and engineering research assistants. Journal of Research Practice, 9, Article M5.

Feldon, D. F., Peugh, J., Timmerman, B. E., Maher, M. A., Hurst, M., Strickland, D., Gilmore, J. A., & Stiegelmeyer, C. (2011). Graduate students’ teaching experiences improve their methodological research skills. Science, 333(6045), 1037-1039.

Feldon, D. F., Maher, M., & Timmerman, B. (2010). Performance-based data in the study of STEM graduate education. Science, 329, 282-283.

Gilmore, J., Strickland, D., Timmerman, B., Maher, M., & Feldon, D. F. (2010). Weeds in the flower garden: An exploration of plagiarism in graduate students' research proposals and its connection to enculturation, ESL, and contextual factors. International Journal of Educational Integrity, 6, 13-28.
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Presentations


Blaney, J. M., Wofford, A. M., Jeong, S., Kang, J., & Feldon, D. F. (2020). How STEM doctoral students make meaning of their academic and professional trajectories: A narrative analysis. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

Blaney, J., Kang, J., Wofford, A., & Feldon, D. F. (2020). “My mental support and my scientific support”: Mentoring relationships between STEM doctoral students and postdocs. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

Feldon, D. F., Blaney, J., & Litson, K. (2020). Contribution vs. recognition: The tenuous role of postdocs in Ph.D. training. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

Blaney, J., Litson, K., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Deconstructing the role of advisor gender in developing STEM students: A longitudinal study of doctoral students in biology. 44th Annual Conference of the Association for the Study of Higher Education.

Feldon, D. F (2019). Broadening participation in computing: Putting our work in context (Invited panelist). SIGCSE 2019.

Feldon, D. F. (2019). The butler didn’t do it: Looking beyond the usual suspects in understanding doctoral success (Keynote presentation). Doctoral Education, Assessment, & Learning Conference.

Feldon, D. F. (2019). Trajectories of student development in the biological sciences: Implications for theory and method (Invited presentation). CRESST Distinguished Lecture Series at UCLA.

Jeong, S., Blaney, J., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Identifying faculty and peer interaction patterns in doctoral students: A latent class analysis. 2019 Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.

Jeong, S., Litson, K., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Role of doctoral training environments in scholarly productivity: Moderation from sense of belonging and research self-efficacy. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

Litson, K., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Controlling for state variability in performance-based measures of Ph.D. research skill development. 2019 Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.

Litson, K., & Feldon, D. F. (2019). Divergent patterns of doctoral skill development across time. 44th Annual Conference of the Association for the Study of Higher Education.


Feldon, D. F. (2018). Desperately seeking socialization. Invited presentation to the University of Pennsylvania Center for Learning Analytics. Philadelphia, PA: July 9. 2018.

Feldon, D. F. (2018). The butler didn’t do it: Looking beyond the usual suspects in understanding doctoral success. Invited presentation to the Council of Graduate Schools Research & Policy Forum. Washington, DC: June 27, 2018.

Jeong, S., & Feldon, D. F. (2018). Profiling students’ faculty and peer interactions during the first three years of doctoral study: Associations with student demographics, sense of belonging, and research productivity. 43rd annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education.

Jeong, S., Feldon, D. F., Maher, M., & Peugh, J. (2018). Doctoral students’ faculty and peer interaction patterns: Relationships to researcher self-efficacy and skill acquisition. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. New York, NY: April, 2018.

Jeong, S., Maher, M., Feldon, D. F., & Peugh, J. (2018). Doctoral satisfaction with faculty advisors: Advisement characteristics and relationship to socialization outcomes. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. New York, NY: April, 2018.

Maher, M., Feldon, D. F., Roksa, J., & Wofford, A. (2018). Making a match: Doctoral students’ experiences with laboratory rotations and permanent advisor selection processes. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. New York, NY: April, 2018.

Roksa, J., Whitley, S., Wofford, A., Feldon, D. F., & Maher, M. (2018). Friendly relations but limited opportunities: Experiences of first-generation and continuing-generation doctoral students. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. New York, NY: April, 2018.

Feldon, D. F. (2017). Panelist: National Academies’ Committee on Revitalizing Graduate STEM Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: November 7, 2017.

Feldon, D. F. (2017). Skills, motivation, and structure (Panelist). National Academies’ Committee on Revitalizing Graduate STEM Education for the 21st Century.

Feldon, D. F., Jeong, S., & Peugh, J. (2017). Progressions of research skill development in the biological sciences. Paper presented at the 15th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education. Honolulu, HI: January 6, 2017.

Feldon, D. F., Jeong, S., Roksa, J., & Peugh, J. (2017). What I did on my summer vacation: Limited impacts of boot camps and summer bridge activities. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. San Antonio, TX: April, 2017.

Roksa, J., Jeong, S., Feldon, D., & Maher, M. (2017). Revisiting the “Model Minority” stereotype: API students’ socialization experiences and research productivity. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education. Houston, TX: November, 2017.

Wofford, A. M., Maher, M. A., Roksa, J., & Feldon, D. F. (2017). The early emergence of doctoral student attrition: Perspectives on early departure in the biomedical sciences. Paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. San Antonio, TX: April, 2017.

Feldon, D. F. (2016). Applying research data to research training. Invited presentation to the National Science Foundation EHR Division of Graduate Education Open House, Inventing the way forward: Graduate education for the STEM workforce. Washington, DC: September 19, 2016.

Feldon, D. F. (2016). Applying research data to research training. Invited keynote to the graduate faculty of the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy. Los Angeles, CA: January 8, 2016. Feldon, D. F. (2016). Hard data on graduate STEM education (Invited presentation). Utah State University Graduate Council.

Feldon, D. F., Peugh, J., Sun, C., Maher, M. A., & Roksa, J. (2016). Gender inequality in supervised research time: A national study of Ph.D. Students in biological sciences. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Washington, DC: April 8-12, 2016.

Maher, M., Say, B., & Feldon, D. F. (2015). Faculty advisers as learners and teachers of disciplinary writing. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Chicago, IL: April 16, 2015.

Rates, C., & Feldon, D. F. (2015). Doctoral biology training and proposed threshold concepts. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Chicago, IL: April 14, 2015.

Rates, C., & Feldon, D. F. (2015). Research skills as threshold concepts in biology graduate education. Paper presented at the 2015 Conference on Higher Education Pedagogy. Blacksburg, VA: February 5, 2015.

Urquhart, S., Maher, M., Feldon, D. F., Gilmore, J., & Timmerman, B. (2015). Lifting the lid on the black box: Primary literature engagement in graduate research skill development. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Chicago, IL: April 16, 2015.

Feldon, D. F., Maher, M. A., Roksa, J., & Peugh, J. (2014). The Matthew effect in STEM Ph.D. programs: A mixed-method study. Paper presented at the 2014 meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Philadelphia, PA: April 7, 2014.

Maher, M., Gilmore, J. A., Feldon, D. F., & Davis, T. (2014). Doctoral student mentoring and the role of cognitive apprenticeship. Paper presented at the 2014 meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Philadelphia, PA: April 6, 2014.

Rates, C., & Feldon, D. F. (2014). Threshold concepts within doctoral biology programs. Paper presented at the 2014 meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Philadelphia, PA: April 3, 2014.
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Press


University of Maryland CHSE: Hill, A. (2018, June 28). UMD researcher awarded NSF grant to study early career researchers' workforce preparation.
Utah State University CEHS News Archive: Havertz, M. (2018, June 22). Traditions of learning: Connecting Native American heritage to STEM.
Michigan State University: Michigan State (2018, January 25). Special presentation: Dr. David Feldon.
Utah State University ITLS News Blog: Havertz, M. (2017, August 2). Dr. David Feldon published research on 'null effects of boot camps' for new doctoral students.
Utah State Today: Lyon, J. (2014, September 18). $1.15 million USU study examines graduate student retention.white space